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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Senior Wins Gates Cambridge Scholarship

Stephen Filippone, a senior in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, has been selected as a recipient of a prestigious Gates Cambridge Scholarships for 2014-2015.

Johns Hopkins Names First Bloomberg Distinguished Professors

Johns Hopkins University has named two of its Nobel Prize- winning biologists and a prominent Harvard University sociologist as Bloomberg Distinguished Professors, the first members of a new group of scholars created to foster collaboration across the institution’s many divisions and help address major world problems.

Oui, 5th Tournées Festival of French Cinema Set for Johns Hopkins

The screenings are all free and open to the public. All films are in French with English subtitles. The movies include a physical comedy, thrillers, a behind-the-scenes documentary on a fabled restaurant and Leos Carax’s art-house favorite Holy Motors.

Satiric Artist Steve Brodner to Speak at Johns Hopkins

For over 25 years, Brodner’s satiric illustrations and editorial cartoons have appeared in nearly every major American periodical, including The New Yorker, Rolling Stone, Vanity Fair, Fortune, Mother Jones, The Nation, The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Los Angeles Times.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Henderson-Hopkins School Ribbon Cutting

An opportunity for media to visit and tour Elmer A. Henderson: A Johns Hopkins Partnership School, the first new public school building in East Baltimore in more than 20 years.

Simulated Blindness Can Help Revive Hearing Loss, Researchers Find

Minimizing a person’s sight for as little as a week may help improve the brain’s ability to process hearing, neuroscientists have found.

The Onion, O’Malley headline Johns Hopkins Foreign Affairs Symposium Series

Gov. Martin O’Malley and writers from the satirical news organization The Onion will appear at Johns Hopkins University as part of the 2014 Foreign Affairs Symposium.

Johns Hopkins Finds With Super Bowl Commercials, Storytelling Beats Sex

They say sex sells, but when it comes to Super Bowl commercials, a Johns Hopkins researcher begs to differ. It’s all about the storytelling, found Keith A. Quesenberry, a lecturer in the university’s Center for Leadership Education.

Spring 2014 Events for Johns Hopkins University Museums

February – May 2014 Exhibition and programming highlights at the Johns Hopkins University museums.

Johns Hopkins Senior Wins Churchill Scholarship

Malinda McPherson, a Johns Hopkins University senior from Belmont, Mass., has won a scholarship from the Winston Churchill Foundation of the United States. The Churchill Scholarship is awarded annually to at least 14 students who have demonstrated a capacity to contribute to the advancement of knowledge in the sciences, engineering or mathematics by completing original, creative work at an advanced level.

Johns Hopkins University Researcher Wins 2014 Pierce Prize for Astronomical Excellence

Nadia L. Zakamska of the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at Johns Hopkins University has been awarded the 2014 Newton Lacy Pierce Prize for outstanding achievement in observational astronomical research.

Johns Hopkins University’s President Receives Contract Extension

Johns Hopkins University’s Board of Trustees voted this week to renew the contract of President Ronald J. Daniels, keeping him at the helm of the nation’s first research institution for another five years. Board chairman Jeffrey H. Aronson, announced the contract renewal, which extends Daniels’ term to 2019.

Johns Hopkins Introduces Master of Science in Government Analytics

In an increasingly data-driven world, there is an urgent need for individuals with the analytical skills necessary to address contemporary political, policy and governance issues.

It’s All Coming Back to Me Now: JHU Researchers Find Caffeine Enhances Memory

For some, it’s the tradition of steeping tealeaves to brew the perfect cup of tea. For others, it’s the morning shuffle to a coffee maker for a hot jolt of java. Then there are those who like their wake up with the kind of snap and a fizz usually found in a carbonated beverage. Regardless of the routine, the consumption of caffeine is the energy boost of choice for millions to wake up or stay up. Now, however, researchers at the Johns Hopkins University have found another use for the stimulant: memory enhancer.

Children’s Brain Imaging Data Bank Could Become a ‘Google’ Tool for Doctors

When an MRI scan uncovers an unusual architecture or shape in a child’s brain, it’s cause for concern: The malformation may be a sign of disease. But deciding whether that odd-looking anatomy is worrisome or harmless can be difficult. To help doctors reach the right decision, Johns Hopkins researchers are building a detailed digital library of MRI scans collected from children with normal and abnormal brains. The goal, the researchers say, is to give physicians a Google-like search system that will enhance the way they diagnose and treat young patients with brain disorders.

JHU Leads Nation in R&D for 34th Straight Year

The Johns Hopkins University led U.S. universities in research spending for the 34th straight year in fiscal 2012, performing $2.106 billion in medical, science and engineering R&D, the National Science Foundation says.

Johns Hopkins Sheridan Libraries Acquire the John Barth Collection

John Barth, a National Book Award winner, was a leading figure in the university’s Writing Seminars department, and his work is central to twentieth-century literary history, especially the development of the contemporary novel, the articulation of international postmodernism, and the identity of Maryland’s Eastern Shore in American literature.

Testosterone In Male Songbirds May Enhance Desire To Sing But Not Song Quality

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have found that introducing testosterone in select areas of a male canary’s brain can affect its ability to successfully attract and mate with a female through birdsong. They also found that enhancing song activity based on testosterone in one brain area can change the size of a separate brain area that regulates song quality.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Christmas Eve Graveside Commemoration of Johns Hopkins on 140th Death Anniversary

Each Dec. 24, people from Johns Hopkins take time from holiday preparations to gather at a plain, unassuming family gravesite in Baltimore’s Green Mount Cemetery. Why? To mark the anniversary of the death of the man who made Johns Hopkins possible: Mr. Johns Hopkins, who died on Christmas Eve in 1873.

Johns Hopkins Selects Early Decision Students from Record Applicant Pool

The Johns Hopkins University is offering early admission to 526 students from 39 U.S. states and 24 countries into its Class of 2018. The university chose them from a record 1,595 early decision applicants — up 11 percent over last year.

Johns Hopkins Senior Anna Wherry Wins Marshall Scholarship

The 21-year-old, who is double majoring in public health in public health and anthropology, is one of 34 students chosen from the United States for the scholarship. She will enroll in Oxford University’s refugee and forced migration studies program and also pursue a masters in social anthropology from the University of Edinburgh.

MedImmune, JHU Agree to Five-Year Research Deal

MedImmune, AstraZeneca’s global biologics research and development arm, and The Johns Hopkins University have entered into a five-year $6.5 million research collaboration.

Media advisory: Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Nelson Mandela legacy

Katherine S. Newman, the James B. Knapp Dean of The Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, whose research focuses on the first generation to come of age in democratic South Africa, is available to discuss the death of anti-apartheid revolutionary Nelson Mandela.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Can a Mousetrap-and-Rubber-Band Device Protect a Plummeting Egg?

Fifty-nine Johns Hopkins freshmen from an introductory mechanical engineering course will compete. Twenty student teams of two or three students have built devices that must be able to transport an uncooked chicken egg from a platform six feet off the ground to a target below—without breaking the egg.

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