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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins, Morgan State Forge Major Engineering Partnership

Program will send Morgan State University students to labs all over the world April 29, 2014 Johns Hopkins MEDIA CONTACT: Jill Rosen Office: 443-997-9906 Cell: 443-547-8805 jrosen@jhu.edu Morgan State MEDIA CONTACT: Jarrett Carter Office: 443-885-3022 Cell: 410-807-6474 jarrett.carter@morgan.edu WHEN: 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Friday, May 2. WHERE: The Center for the Built Environment and [...]

Undergrad Tuition to Rise by 3.5 Percent, Aid 8 Percent

Tuition for full-time liberal arts and engineering undergraduates at the Johns Hopkins University will increase 3.5 percent for the 2014-2015 academic year while the financial aid budget for those students rises almost 8 percent to a record $80 million.

Johns Hopkins Dean Named Provost at UMass Amherst

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels wrote to students, faculty and staff to announce the appointment of Katherine Newman, the James B. Knapp Dean of the university’s Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, as provost of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Student Teams to Compete for Johns Hopkins Business Plan Prize Money on Friday, April 25

The nationally recognized Johns Hopkins University Business Plan Competition, hosted by the Center for Leadership Education, encourages students to take a novel idea or innovative technology and develop a business plan around it. Student presentations and judging will take place from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, April 25, in Hodson Hall on the university’s Homewood campus.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Spring Fair, Pedestrian Safety Event

April 22, 2014 CONTACT: Jill Rosen Office: 443-997-9906 Cell: 443-547-8805 jrosen@jhu.edu What: Spring Fair 2014, a free festival, open to the public, featuring fun for children and adults. There will be 70 craft vendors, a food court, live music (including headline artist J. Cole) and a beer garden. For children there will be games, a [...]

Johns Hopkins Announces 2014 Honorary Degree Recipients

A Pulitzer Prize-winning author and the woman and her lawyer who took the fight for marriage rights to the Supreme Court are among seven distinguished achievers who will receive Johns Hopkins University honorary degrees this year.

Johns Hopkins University Hosts 11th Annual Physics Fair

The Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy will host its 11th annual Physics Fair from 11 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 26 to coincide with the yearly Spring Fair celebration on Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, 3400 N. Charles St. in Baltimore.

Design Flaw in ‘Secure’ Cloud Storage Could Put Privacy at Risk, Researchers Say

Johns Hopkins computer scientists have found a flaw in the way that secure cloud storage companies protect their customers’ data. The scientists say this weakness jeopardizes the privacy protection these digital warehouses claim to offer. Whenever customers share their confidential files with a trusted friend or colleague, the researchers say, the storage provider could exploit the security flaw to secretly view this private data.

MEDIA ADVISORY: As Anniversary of Deepwater Horizon Disaster Approaches, Johns Hopkins Engineer Available to Discuss Oil Spill Research

April 20, 2014, will mark the four-year anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon disaster, a Gulf of Mexico rig explosion that killed 11 workers and led to the nation’s worst offshore oil spill. Reporters writing an update on this event may wish to interview David Murphy, who is studying oil spills in a Whiting School of Engineering lab at Johns Hopkins.

Johns Hopkins Neuroscientists Find Brain Activity May Mark the Beginning of Memories

By tracking brain activity when an animal stops to look around its environment, neuroscientists at Johns Hopkins University believe they can mark the birth of a memory.

Meaning Of ‘The American Dream’ Different For Minorities, Whites

In a report published in the new issue of the journal Urban Studies, Johns Hopkins University sociologist Meredith Greif found that while homeownership can spark feelings of pride in people of any race, it’s more meaningful for minorities. But, because blacks and Latinos buy more homes in disadvantaged communities and are less likely to able to move, they ultimately tend to feel dissatisfied with their community — and potentially their purchase.

Media Advisory: 34 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete Saturday, April 5, in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, April 5, in the Newton White Athletic Center on The Johns Hopkins University’s Homewood campus, more than 100 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX Robotics Championship competition. The event is being hosted by the Center for Educational Outreach at Johns Hopkins’ Whiting School of Engineering, in partnership with Baltimore City Public Schools. The Center’s mission is to increase the number of youth who pursue science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education and careers, particularly women and underrepresented minorities.

Batter Up! Student Math Wizards Aim for the Fences with Baseball Scheduling System

Major League Baseball has begun to get some high-tech help with scheduling. But for their 15 affiliated minor leagues, assembling the multi-team, multi-game calendar remains a tedious, time-consuming task that must be completed by hand. Soon, there may be a better way. Johns Hopkins students and faculty members have started tossing advanced math and powerful computing tools at the arcane art of planning game dates. The result is a new scheduling system that has piqued the interest of minor baseball league executives—and may prove to be useful in applications beyond the ballpark.

Walter White’s Biggest Crime: He’s A Bad Teacher

Walter White of “Breaking Bad” sneaks, lies and manipulates – to say nothing of dealing drugs and killing people. But his biggest crime, a Johns Hopkins University professor says, is being a really, really bad teacher. Political scientist Samuel Chambers makes a case in the spring issue of the journal Theory & Event that the true teaching talent on “Breaking Bad,” the one who could inspire and mentor the student, young Jesse Pinkman, was sociopath drug kingpin Gustavo Fring.

MEDIA ADVISORY: State Finals for Maryland Science Olympiad to Be Held Saturday, March 29, at Johns Hopkins’ Homewood Campus

More than 750 Maryland middle and high school students are expected to participate in the Maryland Science Olympiad state finals. The event is being hosted by the Center for Educational Outreach at Johns Hopkins’ Whiting School of Engineering, in partnership with Maryland Science Olympiad. The Center’s mission is to increase the number of youth who pursue science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education and careers, particularly women and underrepresented minorities.

YouTube Boss To Deliver Johns Hopkins Commencement Address

Susan Wojcicki, CEO of YouTube, will address graduates of Johns Hopkins University at commencement on May 22, 2014. Named one of Fortune’s “50 Most Powerful Women in Business,” one of Forbes’ “100 Most Powerful Women,” and one of Vanity Fair’s 50 “leading innovators [that] shake the foundations of their industries,” Wojcicki became head of the video-sharing powerhouse earlier this year.

Symphony CEO, Educator, Performer Named Dean of Peabody Institute

Fred Bronstein, the highly successful chief executive of one of America’s major symphonies, an accomplished pianist and a dedicated music educator, has been appointed to lead the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University, the nation’s first music conservatory.

Escaping Poor Neighborhoods Can Change A Parent’s Expectations

Despite evidence that people don’t leave impoverished, segregated areas even when offered large housing subsidies, a well-structured voucher program can help inner city residents feel comfortable enough in a more affluent area to want to stay, researchers found.

When the Flu Bug Bites the Big Apple, Twitter Posts Can Tell the Tale

In recent years, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that tweets can help trace nationwide trends in flu outbreaks. Now, in a new study, a team from Johns Hopkins and George Washington universities has drilled even deeper, probing flu-related tweets from a single bustling metropolis: New York City. Twitter data, the team concluded, can accurately gauge the spread of flu at the local level, too.

Cosmic Inflation Finding First Predicted by Johns Hopkins Cosmologist

A team of observational cosmologists may have found evidence that cosmic inflation occurred a fraction of a second after the Big Bang, a point predicted 18 years ago by Johns Hopkins University cosmologist and theoretical physicist Marc Kamionkowski.

Cancer Cells Don’t Engage in ‘Drunken’ Walks as They Spread Through the Body in 3D

Because of results seen in flat lab dishes, biologists have believed that cancers cells move through the body in a slow, aimless fashion, resembling an intoxicated person who cannot walk three steps in a straight line. This pattern, called a random walk, may hold true for cells traveling across two-dimensional lab containers, but Johns Hopkins researchers have discovered that for cells moving through three-dimensional spaces within the body, the “drunken” model doesn’t hold true.

Johns Hopkins Material Scientist Tim Mueller Receives NSF CAREER Award

Tim Mueller, a Johns Hopkins University assistant professor of materials science and engineering, has been selected by the National Science Foundation to receive its prestigious CAREER Award, which recognizes the highest level of excellence and promise in early-stage scholars. His faculty appointment is within the university’s Whiting School of Engineering.

Johns Hopkins Opens Studio For TV, Radio Interviews

The Johns Hopkins University now has a fully equipped studio available for television and radio interviews.

Johns Hopkins Statement: Breach of a University Server

Johns Hopkins has learned from the FBI that information stolen from a Department of Biomedical Engineering web server was posted on the Internet on Thursday, March 6. This came one day after the department received what can only be described as an extortion message from someone claiming to be a member of the hackers’ group called Anonymous.

Are You Smarter Than a 5-Year-Old? Preschoolers Can Do Algebra, Psychologists Find

Millions of high school and college algebra students are united in a shared agony over solving for x and y, and for those to whom the answers don’t come easily, it gets worse: Most preschoolers and kindergarteners can do some algebra before even entering a math class.

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