About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane, It’s – a Key Discovery About Human Memory

As Superman flies over the city, people on the ground famously suppose they see a bird, then a plane, and then finally realize it’s a superhero. But they haven’t just spotted the Man of Steel – they’ve experienced the ideal conditions to create a very strong memory of him.

Johns Hopkins University cognitive psychologists are the first to link human’s long-term visual memory with how things move. The key, they found, lies in whether we can visually track an object. When people see Superman, they don’t think they’re seeing a bird, a plane and a superhero. They know it’s just one thing – even though the distance, lighting and angle change how he looks.

Voice Technology Education at Johns Hopkins Gets a Boost from Amazon

At a time when more home, office and vehicle devices respond to vocal commands, Amazon has selected Johns Hopkins University among the first four schools to receive support from the Alexa Fund Fellowship, a new program designed to encourage advances in voice communication between people and machines.

Panel at Johns Hopkins to Discuss Social Identity Issues

The next event in the JHU Forums on Race in America will feature a panel of scholars and activists discussing how the recognition of multiple, overlapping social identities has a powerful effect on individuals’ daily lives and social movements.

Perlioni Named Johns Hopkins Chief Investment Officer

Jason T. Perlioni, chief investment officer of Pritzker Group Asset Management, has been appointed vice president, investments, and chief investment officer of the Johns Hopkins University

Homewood Museum Director/curator Named

Julia Rose has been appointed the new Director and Curator of Homewood Museum. Rose is currently the director of the West Baton Rouge Museum and an adjunct instructor in museum studies at Louisiana State University. She will begin her new role at Johns Hopkins University on June 1.

President, Wife, Create Student Aid Endowment

Johns Hopkins President Ronald J. Daniels and his wife, faculty member Joanne Rosen, are establishing a $1 million financial aid endowment for undergraduates at the university who are among the first in their families to attend college.

New Gene Sequencing Software Could Aid in Early Detection, Treatment of Cancer

A research team from the United States and Canada has developed and successfully tested new computational software that determines whether a human DNA sample includes an epigenetic add-on linked to cancer and other adverse health conditions.

Media Advisory: Hundreds of College Students to Convene at JHU for Weekend of HopHacks

Graduate and undergraduate students from around the country will gather at Johns Hopkins University for the latest HopHacks, a marathon session challenging students to realize their best software and hardware ideas and compete for cash and other sponsored prizes.

Teens in Poorest Families Go Hungry More Than Younger Kids

In very poor families, teenagers are going hungry twice as often as their younger siblings, a new Johns Hopkins University study finds.

52 Baltimore City School Teams to Compete in Robotics Contest at Johns Hopkins

On Saturday, Feb. 4, more than 200 middle and high school students from Baltimore City Public Schools will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League championship event. This engineering challenge, which changes every year, is presented in the form of a game.

Wanted: Self-Driving Cells to Pursue Deadly Bacteria

Drawing on their expertise in control systems and cell biology, Johns Hopkins University researchers are setting out to design and test troops of self-directed microscopic warriors that can locate and neutralize dangerous strains of bacteria.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Theory for Trump’s Frenetic First Days

Johns Hopkins University political scientist Benjamin Ginsberg offers a possible explanation of the motives behind the flurry of executive orders and presidential memoranda issued during President Donald Trump’s first week in office.

Composer Michael Hersch Wins $250,000 President’s Frontier Award

Johns Hopkins Peabody Institute composer and pianist Michael Hersch, whose groundbreaking work has been performed worldwide, has won the university’s 2017 President’s Frontier Award, an honor that comes with $250,000 for research and innovation.

Message from the President and Provost Regarding Federal Immigration Action

Johns Hopkins University leaders sent an email message on Saturday, Jan. 28, in response to the executive order on immigration issued a day earlier by President Donald Trump.

Pussy Riot Co-founder to Speak at JHU

Activist Nadya Tolokonnikova — a founding member of the all-female, anti-Putin, punk rock artist collective Pussy Riot — will speak at Johns Hopkins University.

City 6th Graders to Debut Underwater Robot Claws Designed for Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins mechanical engineering professor Louis Whitcomb, who specializes in underwater robotics, has challenged 6th graders to design a robotic “claw” able to grab and retrieve submerged objects. On Thursday, students will present and demo their designs before the professor and Johns Hopkins undergraduates who spent two weeks helping them create the claws from corrugated cardboard, straws, string, brass fasteners, tape, paper clips and rubber bands.

MEDIA ADVISORY: What Happens When Hackers Hijack Our Smart Devices?

In a recent segment on NPR’s TED Radio Hour, Johns Hopkins cybersecurity expert Avi Rubin warned that our increasing reliance on Internet-connected add-ons to our home appliances and vehicles could yield unwelcome consequences.

Study Identifies Molecular Signal for Maintaining Adult Neuron

Research led by a Johns Hopkins University biologist sheds light on the subject, potentially pointing the way to a better understanding of how the structure of nerve cells in the adult hippocampus may deteriorate, which can lead to Alzheimer’s disease and other neurological disorders.

Intersession Students Learn the Science Behind Party Food

Beer, wine and cheese are classic party foods that couldn’t be made without fermentation. Fermentation is also the key behind food trends like pickling and the tea drink kombucha. In a one-credit intersession course, Johns Hopkins University undergraduates will learn the chemistry behind this biological process, science that will help them understand when they should send back a bottle of wine, what sets a stout apart from a lager, and why some cheeses ooze while others crumble.

Retired Sen. Barbara Mikulski to Join University Faculty

Barbara A. Mikulski, the longest-serving woman in the history of Congress and Maryland’s longest-tenured U.S. senator, will join the Johns Hopkins University on Jan. 16 as a professor of public policy and presidential adviser.

Captured on Video: DNA Nanotubes Build a Bridge Between Two Molecular Posts

In a microscopic feat that resembled a high-wire circus act, Johns Hopkins researchers have coaxed DNA nanotubes to assemble themselves into bridge-like structures arched between two molecular landmarks on the surface of a lab dish. The team captured examples of this unusual nanoscale performance on video.

ADVISORY: Christmas Eve observance at grave of Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins employees, alumni, students and friends will attend the annual Christmas Eve graveside observance honoring the founder of the university and health system, Mr. Johns Hopkins.

New Bioinformatics Tool Tests Methods for Finding Mutant Genes That ‘Drive’ Cancer

Among the numerous new tactics that aim to spotlight the so-called cancer driver genes, which produce the most accurate results? To help solve this puzzle, a team of Johns Hopkins computational scientists and cancer experts have devised their own bioinformatics software to evaluate how well the current strategies identify cancer-promoting mutations and distinguish them from benign mutations in cancer cells.

Johns Hopkins Welcomes 1st Members of Class of 2021

A talented pool of high school students applied early decision this fall to the Johns Hopkins University, identifying it as their top choice and committing to attend if admitted.

Johns Hopkins Joins Alliance to Expand College Access For 50,000 Talented Lower-income Students

The Johns Hopkins University is joining 29 other colleges and universities to expand by at least 50,000 the number of talented low- and moderate-income students at the U.S. undergraduate institutions with the highest graduation rates.