About Johns Hopkins
Johns Hopkins University

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.


The Amazing Adaptability of the Brain’s Vision Center

By early childhood, the sight regions of a blind person’s brain respond to sound, especially spoken language, a Johns Hopkins University neuroscientist has found.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Class of 2019 Arrives in Baltimore

Johns Hopkins University’s incoming freshmen arrive in Baltimore this week. A highlight for the new class will be Baltimore Day, a chance to get to know the city they’ll call home over the next four years.

Computer Algorithm Can Forecast Patients’ Deadly Sepsis

The quest for early diagnosis of septic shock — which kills more Americans every year than AIDS and breast and prostate cancer combined – now takes a step forward, as Johns Hopkins University researchers report on a more effective way to spot hospital patients at risk of septic shock. The new computer-based method correctly predicts septic shock in 85 percent of cases, without increasing the false positive rate from screening methods that are common now.

Cyber Security Experts to Discuss Tricky Balance Between Data Sharing and Privacy

In its efforts to curb criminal activity, should the government be allowed to see confidential consumer data collected by businesses? Or does the right to privacy trump such intrusions? These complex questions will be the focus of the second annual Senior Executive Cyber Security Conference, to be held Thursday, Sept. 10, at Johns Hopkins University. Registration for the daylong event is under way.

Jason Kravitz Appointed Director of Strategic Communications

Jason Kravitz, a veteran communications and public affairs executive, has been appointed director of strategic communications and senior advisor in the Office of the President.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Future Engineers Use Their Noodles to Build Bridges from Spaghetti

About 160 high school students will compete in the annual Spaghetti Bridge Contest, marking the culmination of a four-week summer course called Engineering Innovation.

$2.2 Million NSF Grant Will Help Johns Hopkins Train New Cybersecurity Experts

At a time when cybersecurity attacks are more frequent and damaging, the National Science Foundation has awarded $2.2 million to the Johns Hopkins University Information Security Institute to support a graduate-level degree program that teaches students how to recognize and protect against digital threats. The grant will be allocated over five years as part of the Federal CyberCorps: Scholarship for Service Program.

Statement from President Ronald J. Daniels on House Passage of 21st Century Cures Act

Johns Hopkins University President Ronald J. Daniels issued a statement today on U.S. House of Representatives passage of the 21st Century Cures Act.

Johns Hopkins University Chemist’s Project Lands Major Federal Grant

A Johns Hopkins University chemist is leading research groups from five schools that won a $7.5 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense for materials science work that could lead to advancements in electronics, computers, optics and weapons technology.

New Computing Center in Baltimore Will Offer Bigger Home for ‘Big Data’ Projects

Whether they’re studying distant galaxies or deadly diseases deep within human cells, Big Data researchers increasingly need more powerful computers and more digital storage space. To address this demand, two Maryland universities are preparing to open one of the nation’s largest academic high-performance computing centers, located at the edge of the Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center campus in Baltimore.

Johns Hopkins Boosts Online Options with Applied Biomedical Engineering Master’s Degree

Johns Hopkins Engineering for Professionals, the division of the Johns Hopkins University Whiting School of Engineering that administers part-time and online graduate programs, has announced that students can now complete its Applied Biomedical Engineering program online.

JHU Museums Summer Calendar Highlights

July – September 2015 Exhibition & Programming Highlights

Tamper-Resistant Pill Dispenser Aims to Stamp Out Medication Misuse

You can whack it with a hammer, attack it with a drill, or even stab it with a screwdriver. But try as you might, you won’t be able to tamper with a high-tech pill dispenser designed by mechanical engineering students at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering. Which is exactly the point.

Women’s Lacrosse Joins Big Ten as Sport Affiliate Member

The Johns Hopkins women’s lacrosse team has been accepted by the Big Ten Conference as a sport affiliate member and will begin play in the league during the 2017 season.

Johns Hopkins Math Students a Hit With Minor League Baseball Schedulers

With the help of some Johns Hopkins University math students, Minor League Baseball is catching up with the majors in using computers to produce its game schedules.

Love and Money: How Low-Income Dads Really Provide

Low-income fathers who might be labeled “deadbeat dads” often spend as much on their children as parents in formal child support arrangements, but they choose to give goods like food and clothing rather than cash, a Johns Hopkins-led study found.

Johns Hopkins Biologist Awarded Pew Research Grant

June 11, 2015 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Arthur Hirsch Office: 443-997-9909 Cell: 443-462-8702 ahirsch6@jhu.edu Christian M. Kaiser, an assistant professor in the Department of Biology at the Johns Hopkins University, has received a $240,000 grant from the Pew Charitable Trusts to study how proteins are produced that function in the cells of all living organisms, [...]

Noninvasive Brain Stimulator May Ease Parkinson’s Symptoms in a Patient’s Home

Parkinson’s disease patients whose symptoms such as tremor, muscle stiffness and slowed movement make it tough to hold an eating utensil steady have few options for relief outside of a hospital or clinic. To give these patients another in-home treatment option, Johns Hopkins graduate students have invented a headband-shaped device to deliver noninvasive brain stimulation to help tamp down the symptoms.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Expert Available to Discuss Restart of LHC

Andrei Gritsan, a Johns Hopkins University associate professor of physics and astronomy who contributed to the discovery of the fundamental particle known as the Higgs boson, is available to discuss the restart of the Large Hadron Collider, where the Higgs boson was detected in 2012.

New York Open-Data Program Chief Joins Center for Government Excellence

Andrew Nicklin, former head of groundbreaking open-data programs in New York city and state, has joined a Johns Hopkins University project to make cities’ data more accessible and help solve urban problems.

When the Color We See Isn’t the Color We Remember

Though people can distinguish between millions of colors, we have trouble remembering specific shades because our brains tend to store what we’ve seen as one of just a few basic hues, a Johns Hopkins University-led team discovered.

New Kit May Help Train Global Health Providers to Insert and Remove Contraceptive Implants

To address a global health challenge, a team of Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineering undergraduates has developed a teaching set called the Contraceptive Implant Training Tool Kit or CITT Kit, for short. The medical simulator includes two training models: a stand-alone replica arm and a layered band that can be worn by health workers who act as “patients” during practice sessions.

$10 Million Aronson Gift Creates International Studies Center

The chair of the Johns Hopkins University’s board of trustees and his wife have committed $10 million to give students new opportunities in international relations and to enhance scholarly work on major world issues.

Who’s Making Sure the Power Stays On?

Electricity systems in the United States are so haphazardly regulated for reliability, it’s nearly impossible for customers to know their true risk of losing service in a major storm, a Johns Hopkins University analysis found.

Undergrad Tuition to Rise 3.5 Percent, Aid 7 Percent

Tuition for full-time liberal arts and engineering undergraduates at the Johns Hopkins University will increase 3.5 percent in the 2015-2016 academic year while the financial aid budget for those students rises 7 percent.