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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.


Two Johns Hopkins Researchers Elected to National Academy of Sciences

Two Johns Hopkins University professors, Aravinda Chakravarti and Donald Geman, are among 84 new members elected to the National Academy of Sciences, an honorary society that advises the government on scientific matters.

Two Johns Hopkins Engineering Faculty Members Receive NSF CAREER Awards

Two junior faculty members in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering have been selected to receive National Science Foundation CAREER Awards, which recognize the highest level of excellence among early-stage researchers. The recipients are Jaafar El-Awady, an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Amitabh Basu, an assistant professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics.

Johns Hopkins Mathematician Receives NSF Grant for Innovative Brain Research

Carey Priebe, a noted mathematician in Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering, has been awarded a National Science Foundation EAGER grant for his work exploring the complex behaviors of the brain’s circuitry.

JHU Expert Finds Randomness in Turbulent Flows

It seems perfectly natural to expect that two motorists who depart from the same location and follow the same directions will end up at the same destination. But according to a Johns Hopkins University mathematical physicist, this is not true when the “directions” are provided by a turbulent fluid flow, such as you find in a churning river or stream. Verifying earlier theoretical predictions, Gregory Eyink’s computer experiments reveal that, in principle, two identical small beads dropped into the same turbulent flow at precisely the same starting location will end up in different – and entirely random – destinations. An article about the phenomenon appears in a recent issue of Physical Review E.