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Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Receives Grant From Medtronic for Student Engineering Program Focused on Medical Devices for Developing Countries

Medtronic, one of the world’s largest medical technology companies, has entered into an innovative partnership with The Johns Hopkins University, agreeing to provide $200,000 a year for up to three years and skilled mentoring to help biomedical engineering students design new healthcare solutions for underserved patients in developing countries.

Johns Hopkins Students’ Device Aims to Avert Repeated Breast Cancer Surgeries

When a breast tumor is detected, many women opt to have a lumpectomy, which is surgery designed to remove the diseased tissue while preserving the breast. But during this procedure, doctors cannot learn right away whether all of the cancerous tissue has been removed, with no microscopic signs that cancer cells were left behind. Because of this delay, one in five of these women—up to 66,000 patients annually in the U.S. alone—must return for a second surgery to remove remaining cancer. These follow-up operations boost healthcare costs and can lead to delays in receiving other treatments such as radiation and chemotherapy. To reduce the need for these second surgeries, four Johns Hopkins graduate students have designed a device to allow pathologists to quickly inspect excised breast tissue within 20 minutes, while the patient is still in the operating room.

Johns Hopkins Students Win Two Top Awards in National Biomedical Engineering Contest

Johns Hopkins student-built devices—a blood clot detection system and a concealable, hands-free breast pump—have won two of the top three awards in a national contest that recognizes innovative biomedical engineering designs that have high commercial potential and social impact.

Low-Cost ‘Cooling Cure’ Could Avert Brain Damage in Oxygen-Starved Babies

When babies are deprived of oxygen before birth, brain damage and disorders such as cerebral palsy can occur. Extended cooling can prevent brain injuries, but this treatment is not always available in developing nations where advanced medical care is scarce. To address this need, Johns Hopkins undergraduates have devised a low-tech $40 unit to provide protective cooling in the absence of modern hospital equipment that can cost $12,000.

‘Future of Suture’ Device Wins $12,500 Inventors Prize for Johns Hopkins Students

For devising a disposable suturing tool to guide the placement of stitches and guard against the accidental puncture of internal organs, an undergraduate biomedical engineering team from Johns Hopkins won the $12,500 first-prize Tuesday in the 2012 Collegiate Inventors Competition.

Computational Medicine Begins to Enhance the Way Doctors Detect and Treat Disease

Computational medicine, a fast-growing method of using computer models and sophisticated software to figure out how disease develops–and how to thwart it–has begun to leap off the drawing board and land in the hands of doctors who treat patients for heart ailments, cancer and other illnesses. Using digital tools, researchers have begun to use experimental and clinical data to build models that can unravel complex medical mysteries. These are some of the conclusions of a new review of the field, written by four Johns Hopkins professors affiliated with the university’s Institute for Computational Medicine.

Undergraduates’ Cellphone Screening Device for Anemia Wins $250,000 Prize

Could a low-cost screening device connected to a cellphone save thousands of women and children from anemia-related deaths and disabilities? That’s the goal of Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering undergraduates who say they’ve developed a noninvasive way to identify women with this dangerous blood disorder in developing nations.

New Early Warning System for Seizures Could Lead to Fewer False Alarms

Srivdevi Sarma, a Johns Hopkins biomedical engineer, has devised new seizure detection software that, in early testing, significantly cuts the number of unneeded pulses of current that epilepsy patients would receive from new brain implants devices.

Coulter Grant Will Help Johns Hopkins Make New Devices to Improve Patient Care

The Johns Hopkins Department of Biomedical Engineering has received a Coulter Foundation Translational Partnership Award that will result in $5 million in funding over the next five years to speed the movement of new medical devices out of the university’s labs and into hospitals and doctor’s offices.

Screening Tests for Pregnant Women Win Global Health Prize for Johns Hopkins Students

A team of Johns Hopkins graduate students who developed a low-cost health kit designed to screen pregnant women in developing countries for life-threatening conditions won the grand prize this week in an international competition seeking ways to improve maternal health.

‘Intelligent’ Surgical Drill Wins Third-Place Prize for Johns Hopkins Student Inventors

An “intelligent” drill developed by Johns Hopkins students to improve orthopedic surgical procedures was awarded third-place honors in the undergraduate division of the 2010 Collegiate Inventors Competition. The team received $2,500 in prize money for its entry, which was among five finalist projects competing Oct. 27 at a Washington, D.C., ceremony.

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