About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

New Ultra-Miniaturized Scope Less Invasive, Produces Higher Quality Images

Johns Hopkins engineers have created a new lens-free ultra-miniaturized endoscope, the size of a few human hairs in width, that is less bulky and can produce higher quality images.

Breakthrough Method for Processing Nanomaterials Heralds Advances in Quantum Computing, Nanotechnology

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a new method for producing atomically-thin semiconducting crystals that could one day enable more powerful and compact electronic devices.

By using specially-treated silicon surfaces to tailor the crystals’ size and shape, the researchers have found a potentially faster and less expensive way to produce next-generation semiconductor crystals for microchips. The crystalline materials produced this way could in turn enable new scientific discoveries and accelerate technological developments in quantum computing, consumer electronics, and higher efficiency solar cells and batteries.

Beyond Tofurky: Can the Alt-Meat Trend Reach Thanksgiving?

Jan Dutkiewicz, a political scientist at Johns Hopkins and an expert in the alternative meat industry, can explain:
How the history of the Impossible Burger and other popular alternative meats can be traced to Thanksgiving.
Why despite the current plant-based meat craze, there is not yet a turkey option that’s created as much buzz.
How in the future Thanksgivings, with lab-grown meat soon to be available, people might be able to buy turkey created in a petri dish.

Sounds of Mosquito Mating Rituals Could Lead to Quieter Drones, Nontoxic Pest Control

Mosquitoes flap their wings not just to stay aloft but for two other critical purposes: to generate sound and to point that buzz in the direction of a potential mate, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered. Their findings about the aerodynamics of mosquito wings could have implications for building quieter drones and for devising nontoxic methods to trap and exterminate the pests.

ADVISORY: JHU Experts Available on 30th Anniversary of Berlin Wall’s fall

Johns Hopkins University experts are available to offer perspective on the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Babies Understand Counting Years Earlier Than Believed

Babies who are years away from being able to say “one,” “two,” and “three” actually already have a sense of what counting means, Johns Hopkins University researchers have discovered.

The findings reveal that very early on, years earlier than previously believed, babies who hear counting realize that it’s about quantity.

ADVISORY: He Knows What Puts the YIKES Into the Scariest Stories

During this season when fear is in fashion, the only time of year when people look forward to feeling afraid, a Johns Hopkins University professor, an expert in zombies, vampires, horror literature and slasher films, is available to talk about what exactly puts the shiver into the world’s scariest stories.

ADVISORY: New Indigenous People’s Day at JHU Re-imagines Columbus Day

Indigenous Peoples Day is a new tradition at Johns Hopkins University that celebrates a vital population in our community. A reimagining of Columbus Day, the event will honor the rich heritage of Indigenous communities with a Pow-Wow featuring singing, drummers, dancing, and tastings of tribal cuisine.

Johns Hopkins Researchers Discover Superconducting Material That Could Someday Power Quantum Computer

Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers.

Buttons and Flies Help Hopkins Solve Longtime DNA Mystery

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development.

MEDIA ADVISORY: “Vision for Baltimore” Partners Focus on Improving City School Students’ Eyesight

In honor of World Sight Day, Vision for Baltimore will host a vision health fair at Henderson-Hopkins School on Thursday, October 10. Now in its fourth year, Vision for Baltimore is a citywide program between The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore City Public Schools, Baltimore City Health Department, nonprofit Vision To Learn and eyewear retailer Warby Parker to provide all pre-K through 8th grade public school students with vision screenings, eye exams and eyeglasses, all at no out-of-pocket costs for families. Other funders include the Annie E. Casey Foundation and the Abell Foundation.

Positive Hiring Outlook for Data Analytics Jobs in Government

The market for data analytics jobs in federal, state and local government is expected to expand over the next two years as public agencies across the nation increasingly rely on data to improve operations, according to a new survey conducted by Johns Hopkins University and two partners, REI Systems and ACT-IAC.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Prepares for Annual Day of Service in Baltimore

Weeding, canvassing neighborhoods to share information about community resources and picking up trash. These are just some of the ways more than 1,300 Johns Hopkins University students, faculty and staff will try to help the city on Saturday, Sept. 21, as they volunteer en masse at 38 Baltimore non-profit organizations.

SNF Agora Institute Unveils Plans for New Project in Baltimore Designed by Renzo Piano Building Workshop

The Stavros Niarchos Foundation Agora Institute at Johns Hopkins University has unveiled plans for the Institute’s home in Baltimore, designed by world-renowned architecture firm Renzo Piano Building Workshop. The new structure on the Homewood campus promises to represent the mission and values of the Institute as well as the creativity and vibrancy of the university and the city.

Don’t Miss a Beat: Computer Simulations May Treat Most Common Heart Rhythm Disorder

Scientists at Johns Hopkins have successfully created personalized digital replicas of the upper chambers of the heart and used them to guide the precise treatment of patients suffering from persistent irregular heartbeats. These simulations accurately identified where clinicians need to destroy tissue to restore the heart’s normal rhythm.

Dark Matter May Be Older Than The Big Bang, Study Suggests

Dark matter, which researchers believe make up about 80% of the universe’s mass, is one of the most elusive mysteries in modern physics. What exactly it is and how it came to be is a mystery, but a new Johns Hopkins University study now suggests that dark matter may have existed before the Big Bang.

A Rocky Relationship: 2.5 Billion Years of Earth’s Continents Breaking Up and Getting Back Together

A new study of rocks that formed billions of years ago lends fresh insight into how Earth’s plate tectonics, or the movement of large pieces of Earth’s outer shell, evolved over the planet’s 4.56-billion-year history.

JHU: How Some Older Brains Decline Before People Realize It

Some older adults without noticeable cognitive problems have a harder time than younger people in separating irrelevant information from what they need to know at a given time, and a new Johns Hopkins University study could explain why.

Cancer Tissue-Freezing Approach May Help More Breast Cancer Patients in Lower Income Countries

A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

Johns Hopkins University files Preliminary Design for “Hopkins D.C.” Facility for Informational Review by the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts

On July 3, Johns Hopkins University, along with the architecture and design team of Ennead Architects and SmithGroup, filed for an informational review with the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts for the proposed “Hopkins D.C.” facility in the property currently housing the Newseum at 555 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW. This is a first step to obtain early feedback from CFA in advance of the formal review process that will begin later in the year, along with reviews and approvals by other entities.

A Snapshot in Time: Study Captures Fleeting Cell Differences That Can Alter Disease Risk

In cinema and science fiction, one small change in the past can have major, sometimes life-changing effects in the future. Using a series of snapshots, researchers recently captured such so-called “butterfly effects” in heart muscle cell development, and say this new view into the sequence of gene expression activity may lead to better understanding disease risk.

Local Civic Leader Alicia Wilson to Join Johns Hopkins as Vice President for Economic Development

Alicia Wilson, an accomplished attorney and civic leader with deep expertise in creating local economic opportunity, has been appointed vice president for economic development for Johns Hopkins University and Johns Hopkins Health System. She will lead the newly-created Office of Economic Development when she joins the organization in July.

Flamingoes, Elephants and Sharks: How Do Blind Adults Learn About Animal Appearance?

They’ve never seen animals like hippos and sharks but adults born blind have rich insight into what they look like, a new Johns Hopkins University study found.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Commencement Set for May 23

More than 1,000 Johns Hopkins University students will claim their degrees Thursday, May 23, at the commencement ceremony for all of the University’s divisions and campuses.

Inaugural BLocal Effort Drives Millions of Dollars Into Baltimore

Twenty-five local companies that came together pledging to create more economic opportunity in Baltimore report after the first three years of that effort, they’re buying $50 million more from city and with minority vendors than they had been and have hired more than 1,700 Baltimore residents.