About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

ADVISORY: Experts Available to Discuss Role of Antibiotic Resistance in Pandemic Risk

Researchers investigating the drug prescription response to a “superbug” enzyme that renders bacteria resistant to antibiotics are available to discuss why such resistance is posing a growing risk during pandemics such as the current coronavirus.

ADVISORY: Experts Available to Discuss Improving Rapid Detection of Pandemics

Scientists developing a rapid system for tackling outbreaks of avian influenza at their origins in Thailand are available to discuss their project and how it could potentially help improve responses to other pandemic threats such as coronavirus.

ADVISORY: JHU Profs Would End Leap Year with New ‘Permanent’ Calendar

This year, 2020, is leap year. And if two Johns Hopkins University professors had their way it would be the last. An economist and an astrophysicist have designed a new, simpler calendar, where the days would align in precisely the same way every year and a person could buy one calendar and use it forever. Every year would begin on Monday, Jan. 1. And of course leap year would be extinct, as would the occasional extra day for February.

ADVISORY: JHU Experts Distill Coronavirus Facts in Web Event

Today a panel of Johns Hopkins University experts convened to offer facts on the outbreak of 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV), originating in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, a virus that is spreading across the globe and has been declared a public health emergency by the World Health Organization and the U.S. government.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss How Racism, Xenophobia Can Spread in Tandem with Coronavirus

A sociology professor at Johns Hopkins University is available to discuss how the racist and xenophobic treatment of people of Chinese ancestry often escalates during outbreaks of disease such as the current coronavirus that began in China and is spreading worldwide.

Baltimore Diversity Cornerstone of Newly Announced HopkinsLocal Goals

In announcing new HopkinsLocal goals tightly focused on addressing inequality in Baltimore, Johns Hopkins is doubling down on efforts to build the city’s economy by bringing work and opportunity to the people in the city who need it most.

What’s in Your Water?

Mixing drinking water with chlorine, the United States’ most common method of disinfecting drinking water, creates previously unidentified toxic byproducts, says  Carsten Prasse from Johns Hopkins University and his collaborators from the University of California, Berkeley and Switzerland.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss How China’s Politics Affect Coronavirus Response

A sociology professor at Johns Hopkins University is available to discuss whether China’s hardened domestic authoritarianism and expanded global influence since the 2003 SARS outbreak is helping or hindering the international response to the new coronavirus. 

MEDIA ADVISORY: 500 Baltimore City Public Schools Students to Compete in Robotics Contest at JHU

More than 500 elementary, middle, and high school Baltimore City Public Schools students will compete in the Hopkins Robotics Cup, the Baltimore City VEX and VEX IQ Robotics League championship event.

JHU Humanities Program for Community College Students to Expand

A summer program that gives area community college students an opportunity to bolster their academic confidence while conducting humanities research at Johns Hopkins University will expand with a new $1.8 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss Tracking of Coronavirus

A co-director of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering is available to discuss the center’s website, launched today to track the international spread of coronavirus in real time. The data visualizations are all available for download. 

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss Roots of Trump Impeachment

Three decades ago Johns Hopkins University political scientist Benjamin Ginsberg warned in his book, Politics By Other Means, that party loyalty was beginning to trump a higher sense of national duty among elected leaders. The trend, he wrote, would one day “undermine the governing capacities of the nation’s institutions, diminishing the ability of America’s government to manage domestic and foreign affairs, and contributing to the erosion of the nation’s international political and economic standing.”

MEDIA ADVISORY: Report Builds Framework For ‘Digital Political Ethics’

With the 2020 elections looming and amid continuing concerns over social media’s role in U.S. politics, Johns Hopkins University has an expert ready to discuss a comprehensive new report recommending how candidates, tech platforms and regulators can ensure that digital political campaigns promote and protect fair elections.

Media advisory: Christmas Eve Graveside Commemoration Marks 146th Anniversary of Johns Hopkins’ Death

Johns Hopkins employees, alumni, students and friends will attend the annual Christmas Eve graveside observance honoring the founder of the university and health system, Mr. Johns Hopkins.

New Space Image Reveals Cosmic ‘Candy Cane’

Deep in our Milky Way galaxy’s center, a candy cane emerges as the centerpiece of a new, colorful composite image from a NASA camera, just in time for the holidays.

New Ultra-Miniaturized Scope Less Invasive, Produces Higher Quality Images

Johns Hopkins engineers have created a new lens-free ultra-miniaturized endoscope, the size of a few human hairs in width, that is less bulky and can produce higher quality images.

Breakthrough Method for Processing Nanomaterials Heralds Advances in Quantum Computing, Nanotechnology

Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a new method for producing atomically-thin semiconducting crystals that could one day enable more powerful and compact electronic devices.

By using specially-treated silicon surfaces to tailor the crystals’ size and shape, the researchers have found a potentially faster and less expensive way to produce next-generation semiconductor crystals for microchips. The crystalline materials produced this way could in turn enable new scientific discoveries and accelerate technological developments in quantum computing, consumer electronics, and higher efficiency solar cells and batteries.

Beyond Tofurky: Can the Alt-Meat Trend Reach Thanksgiving?

Jan Dutkiewicz, a political scientist at Johns Hopkins and an expert in the alternative meat industry, can explain:
How the history of the Impossible Burger and other popular alternative meats can be traced to Thanksgiving.
Why despite the current plant-based meat craze, there is not yet a turkey option that’s created as much buzz.
How in the future Thanksgivings, with lab-grown meat soon to be available, people might be able to buy turkey created in a petri dish.

Sounds of Mosquito Mating Rituals Could Lead to Quieter Drones, Nontoxic Pest Control

Mosquitoes flap their wings not just to stay aloft but for two other critical purposes: to generate sound and to point that buzz in the direction of a potential mate, researchers at Johns Hopkins University have discovered. Their findings about the aerodynamics of mosquito wings could have implications for building quieter drones and for devising nontoxic methods to trap and exterminate the pests.

ADVISORY: JHU Experts Available on 30th Anniversary of Berlin Wall’s fall

Johns Hopkins University experts are available to offer perspective on the 30th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall.

Babies Understand Counting Years Earlier Than Believed

Babies who are years away from being able to say “one,” “two,” and “three” actually already have a sense of what counting means, Johns Hopkins University researchers have discovered.

The findings reveal that very early on, years earlier than previously believed, babies who hear counting realize that it’s about quantity.

ADVISORY: He Knows What Puts the YIKES Into the Scariest Stories

During this season when fear is in fashion, the only time of year when people look forward to feeling afraid, a Johns Hopkins University professor, an expert in zombies, vampires, horror literature and slasher films, is available to talk about what exactly puts the shiver into the world’s scariest stories.

ADVISORY: New Indigenous People’s Day at JHU Re-imagines Columbus Day

Indigenous Peoples Day is a new tradition at Johns Hopkins University that celebrates a vital population in our community. A reimagining of Columbus Day, the event will honor the rich heritage of Indigenous communities with a Pow-Wow featuring singing, drummers, dancing, and tastings of tribal cuisine.

Johns Hopkins Researchers Discover Superconducting Material That Could Someday Power Quantum Computer

Quantum computers with the ability to perform complex calculations, encrypt data more securely and more quickly predict the spread of viruses, may be within closer reach thanks to a new discovery by Johns Hopkins researchers.

Buttons and Flies Help Hopkins Solve Longtime DNA Mystery

Biologists at Johns Hopkins University have uncovered an important clue in the longtime mystery of how long strands of DNA fold up to squeeze into microscopic cells, with each pair of chromosomes aligned to ensure perfect development.