About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Johns Hopkins Undergraduate Team Named Finalist in Collegiate Inventors Competition

A team of Johns Hopkins University students are among the finalists in the Collegiate Inventors Competition for their invention of a device to reduce pain from nerve damage in people with amputations.

Hurricane Ida: Johns Hopkins Experts Can Discuss What Lies Ahead for Hard-Hit Areas

August 30, 2021 Kait Howard Cell: 443-301-7993 kehoward@jhu.edu jhunews@jhu.edu As Louisiana officials assess the destruction caused by Hurricane Ida, Johns Hopkins University experts can discuss anticipated damage, the effectiveness of the levee system, and next steps for search-and-rescue efforts and restoring power. Available experts include: Gonzalo Pita is an associate scientist and director of the […]

New Tool Predicts Sudden Death in Inflammatory Heart Disease

Johns Hopkins University scientists have developed a new tool for predicting which patients suffering from a complex inflammatory heart disease are at risk of sudden cardiac arrest.

Motivation at an Empty Olympics? Johns Hopkins Expert Available On Mental Aspects of Top Athletic Performance

The Summer Olympics in Tokyo, which officially begin today, will be held without fans because of COVID-19. A Johns Hopkins University expert on the types of motivation that influence performance is available to discuss how that might affect outcomes at the games.

Vikram Chib, an associate professor in Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Biomedical Engineering, has studied the neural aspects behind performance, including what happens when people choke under pressure, and how having an audience can make you perform better.

Johns Hopkins Expert Can Discuss Possible Cause of Florida Tower Collapse

In the wake of the devastating collapse of a Miami-area condominium tower, a Johns Hopkins University civil engineer can discuss the possibility that shifting soil beneath the building led to the massive structural failure.

Preview Latest in Science, Research During Hopkins on the Hill Event

Federal funding sustains much of the critical research underway at Johns Hopkins University and Medicine. The biennial event, Hopkins on the Hill, showcases the range, value, and impact of this work.

Instead of the usual one big event on Capitol Hill, Hopkins on the Hill is virtual this year, with lunchtime programming spread across May and June. It’s a chance to learn about the cutting-edge science and projects, straight from the early career researchers and practitioners working on it. The sessions will cover everything from space exploration and extreme materials development to Hopkins’ work to track and combat COVID-19.

Johns Hopkins Launches Institute Focused on Creating Clean, Renewable Energy Technologies

With a $20 million gift from the estate of trustee emeritus and alumnus Ralph S. O’Connor, the Johns Hopkins University and its Whiting School of Engineering today announced the establishment of the Ralph S. O’Connor Sustainable Energy Institute (ROSEI) to serve as the university’s interdisciplinary home for ongoing research and education aimed at creating clean, renewable, and sustainable energy technologies.

JHU Engineers Develop Drive-thru Type Test to Detect Viral Infections in Bacteria

The pandemic has made clear the threat that some viruses pose to humans. But viruses can also infect life-sustaining bacteria and a Johns Hopkins University-led team has developed a test to determine if bacteria are sick, similar to the one used to test humans for COVID-19.

Machine Learning Tool Gives Early Warning Of Cardiac Issues in COVID Patients

A team of Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineers and heart specialists have developed an algorithm that warns doctors several hours before hospitalized COVID-19 patients experience cardiac arrest or blood clots.

Johns Hopkins Scientist Develops Method To Find Toxic Chemicals In Drinking Water

Most consumers of drinking water in the United States know that chemicals are used in the treatment processes to ensure the water is safe to drink. But they might not know that the use of some of these chemicals, such as chlorine, can also lead to the formation of unregulated toxic byproducts.

JHU Undergrads Win $250,000 Prize in Global Mask Design Challenge

A Johns Hopkins University team of 24 undergraduate students that’s come up with a clear, adaptable face mask has won the Future Forward Award in a global challenge to design a better mask.

JHU Undergrads Finalists in Global Mask Design Challenge

A Johns Hopkins University team of 24 undergraduate students that’s come up with a clear, adaptable face mask is among five finalists in a global challenge to design a better mask.

Johns Hopkins Team Develops Software That Cuts Time, Cost From Gene Sequencing

A team of Johns Hopkins University researchers has developed a new software that could revolutionize how DNA is sequenced, making it far faster and less expensive to map anything from yeast genomes to cancer genes.

Dog Training Methods Help JHU Teach Robots to Learn New Tricks

With a training technique commonly used to teach dogs to sit and stay, Johns Hopkins University computer scientists showed a robot how to teach itself several new tricks, including stacking blocks. With the method, the robot, named Spot, was able to learn in days what typically takes a month.

New Test Can Target and Capture Most Lethal Cells in Fatal Brain Cancer

A laboratory test developed by a research team led by Johns Hopkins University bioengineers can accurately pinpoint, capture and analyze the deadliest cells in the most common and aggressive brain cancer in adults.

New Method Can Pinpoint Cracks In Metal Long Before They Cause Catastrophes

When metallic components in airplanes, bridges and other structures crack, the results are often catastrophic. But Johns Hopkins University researchers have found a way to reliably predict the vulnerabilities earlier than current tests. In a paper published today in Science, Johns Hopkins University researchers detail a new method for testing metals at a microscopic scale that allows them to rapidly inflict repetitive loads on materials while recording how ensuing damage evolves into cracks.

Two Johns Hopkins Teams Finalists in Collegiate Inventors Competition

One team has invented a tool that could shave hours from a rhinoplasty. Another has created a sensor that ignores background noise – a device that could improve everything from telemedicine to Zoom calls.

These two Johns Hopkins University teams, a group of undergraduates and a group of graduates, are among the finalists announced today by the Collegiate Inventors Competition, an annual contest founded by the National Inventors Hall of Fame to encourage innovation and entrepreneurship at the collegiate level.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hopkins Professor Available To Discuss California Power Outages, Electrical Grid Management and Renewable Energy

Benjamin Hobbs, a Johns Hopkins University professor of environmental health and engineering, is available to speak to the media about issues related to the California energy grid and a new effort to build more renewable energy into power markets over the next decade.

Lauren Gardner Named To TIME 100 List Of World’s Most Influential People Of 2020

TIME named a Johns Hopkins University professor to its 2020 list of the 100 most influential people in the world for developing a free and open website that empowers the international community to track the COVID-19 pandemic in near-real time with reliable, independent data.

New Genetic Analysis Method Could Advance Personal Genomics

Geneticists could identify the causes of disorders that currently go undiagnosed if standard practices for collecting individual genetic information were expanded to capture more variants that researchers can now decipher, concludes new Johns Hopkins University research.

JHU Robotic System Remotely Controls Ventilators In COVID-19 Patient Rooms

August 12, 2020 CONTACT: Doug Donovan Cell: 443-462-2947 dougdonovan@jhu.edu @dougdonovan A new robotic system allows medical staff to remotely operate ventilators and other bedside machines from outside intensive care rooms of patients suffering from infectious diseases. The system, developed by a team of Johns Hopkins University and Medicine researchers, is still being tested, but initial […]

Individuals Physically Distanced Before State Mandates, Slowing COVID-19 Spread

Residents in all 25 of the U.S. counties hardest hit by COVID-19 began to limit their public movements six to 29 days before states implemented stay-at-home orders, according to Johns Hopkins University researchers.

Juicy Genomics

When Pulitzer Prize and Grammy award winner Kendrick Lamar rapped “I got millions, I got riches buildin’ in my DNA,” he almost certainly wasn’t talking about the humble tomato. But a new study unveiling more than 230,000 DNA differences across 100 tomato varieties which will allow breeders and scientists to engineer larger, juicier, more profitable plants, proves that tomatoes indeed have riches buildin’ in their DNA, too.

Jitterbug: Roaches and Robots Shake It To Transition Between Movements In Tricky Terrain

By chasing cockroaches through an obstacle course and studying their movements, the Johns Hopkins engineers that brought you the cockroach robot and the snake robot discovered that animals’ movement transitions corresponded to overcoming potential energy barriers and that they can jitter around to traverse obstacles in complex terrain.

Johns Hopkins Aids National Effort To Build A Secure Smart Home

Smart homes of today – with lights, refrigerators and Alexa all talking to each other – aren’t nearly as smart as they need to be to thwart virtual burglars from breaking in. To address the massive security threat to interconnected devices known as the Internet of Things (IoT), Johns Hopkins University and six other institutions are embarking on an effort to fortify vulnerable points of entry against hackers.