About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Bug Appetit: Why Eating Cicadas is Good for the Environment

Trillions of cicadas are poised to get their buzz on across much of the United States, with the once-every-17-year emergence of Brood X. Hope you’re hungry!

One person’s infestation is another’s free eco-friendly lunch, according to Johns Hopkins University sustainable food expert Jessica Fanzo, author of the forthcoming Can Fixing Dinner Fix the Planet?

Fanzo, who plans to collect and eat cicadas herself as soon as they hit her own backyard, can explain how the insects have as much protein as red or other factory-farmed meat, but without the harsh environmental effects, including greenhouse gases and biodiversity loss.

What Spurs People to Save the Planet? Stories or Facts?

With climate change looming, what must people hear to convince them to change their ways to stop harming the environment? A new Johns Hopkins University study finds stories to be significantly more motivating than scientific facts— at least for some people.

Johns Hopkins Launches Institute Focused on Creating Clean, Renewable Energy Technologies

With a $20 million gift from the estate of trustee emeritus and alumnus Ralph S. O’Connor, the Johns Hopkins University and its Whiting School of Engineering today announced the establishment of the Ralph S. O’Connor Sustainable Energy Institute (ROSEI) to serve as the university’s interdisciplinary home for ongoing research and education aimed at creating clean, renewable, and sustainable energy technologies.

JHU Engineers Develop Drive-thru Type Test to Detect Viral Infections in Bacteria

The pandemic has made clear the threat that some viruses pose to humans. But viruses can also infect life-sustaining bacteria and a Johns Hopkins University-led team has developed a test to determine if bacteria are sick, similar to the one used to test humans for COVID-19.

Johns Hopkins Scientist Develops Method To Find Toxic Chemicals In Drinking Water

Most consumers of drinking water in the United States know that chemicals are used in the treatment processes to ensure the water is safe to drink. But they might not know that the use of some of these chemicals, such as chlorine, can also lead to the formation of unregulated toxic byproducts.

JHU Team’s Acoustic Sensor Wins Runner-Up Award in Inventors Competition

A team of Johns Hopkins University graduate students that invented a sensor that ignores background noise and could improve everything from telemedicine to Zoom calls has won the Runner-Up Award in the Collegiate Inventors Competition.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Hopkins Professor Available To Discuss California Power Outages, Electrical Grid Management and Renewable Energy

Benjamin Hobbs, a Johns Hopkins University professor of environmental health and engineering, is available to speak to the media about issues related to the California energy grid and a new effort to build more renewable energy into power markets over the next decade.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Expert Leads International Effort To Determine Climate’s Impact On Spread Of COVID-19

Ben Zaitchik, a professor of Earth and planetary sciences at Johns Hopkins University, is available to speak with the media about the vigorous research still needed to definitively determine if and how climate, environmental and meteorological elements influence the spread of COVID-19.

Researchers Find ‘Major Transformation’ In Global Climate Policy Ideas

The economic ideas that dominate global climate policy have undergone a “major transformation” over the past three decades from strictly market-based notions to recent diversified approaches featuring more government intervention, according to new research published in Nature Climate Change by a Johns Hopkins University political scientist.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Comment on Effects of Social Distancing and Quarantine Measures on Air Quality

A silver lining of social distancing and quarantine? Better air quality. As more and more cities across the U.S. clamp down on travel, there have been fewer cars on the road and early reports of improved air quality in cities like Los Angeles, Philadelphia and more. Peter DeCarlo, an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at The Johns Hopkins University, can discuss how and to what extent social distancing and quarantine measures affect air pollution.

More Pavement, More Problems

Think your daily coffee, boutique gym membership and airport lounge access cost a lot? There may be an additional, hidden cost to those luxuries of urban living, says a new Johns Hopkins University study: more flooding.

For every percentage point increase in roads, parking lots and other impervious surfaces that prevent water from flowing into the ground, annual floods increase on average by 3.3%, the researchers found.

Beyond Tofurky: Can the Alt-Meat Trend Reach Thanksgiving?

Jan Dutkiewicz, a political scientist at Johns Hopkins and an expert in the alternative meat industry, can explain:
How the history of the Impossible Burger and other popular alternative meats can be traced to Thanksgiving.
Why despite the current plant-based meat craze, there is not yet a turkey option that’s created as much buzz.
How in the future Thanksgivings, with lab-grown meat soon to be available, people might be able to buy turkey created in a petri dish.

Johns Hopkins Announces Major Solar Power Commitment

In the largest commitment to solar energy in Maryland and one of the most significant pledges to greenhouse gas reduction in higher education, Johns Hopkins University has entered into a long-term agreement to supply its campuses with more than 250,000 megawatt hours of solar power per year.

China’s Regulations Unsuccessful in Curbing Methane Emissions

China, already the world’s leading emitter of human-caused greenhouse gases, continues to pump increasing amounts of climate-changing methane into the atmosphere despite tough new regulations on gas releases from its coal mines, a new Johns Hopkins study shows.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

JHU Project Aims to Save Millions by Reducing Solar Power Forecast Errors

Although the popularity of solar energy has surged, the unpredictability of a weather-dependent technology has kept even more people from embracing it. A new Johns Hopkins University-led project hopes to change that by improving our ability to forecast sunshine and backup power needs.

Flaw Found in Water Treatment Methods

Some potentially toxic chemicals in water may be created, ironically, during the water treatment process itself.

Science and Health News Tips from Johns Hopkins

These news tips come from stories in the winter issue of Johns Hopkins Magazine.

Secrets of Ancient Egypt May Spark Better Fuel Cells for Tomorrow’s Cars

To make modern-day fuel cells less expensive and more powerful, a team led by Johns Hopkins chemical engineers has drawn inspiration from the ancient Egyptian tradition of gilding.

JHU Scientist Crowdsources Rocks Harboring Earthly “Extraterrestrials”

Crowdsourcing has been used to create an online photography archive, finance a British rock band’s tour and search for intelligent life on other planets. Now, Johns Hopkins University biologist Jocelyne DiRuggiero is hoping the approach can help her find rocks.

Environmentalist Winona LaDuke to Speak at Johns Hopkins

The next event in the JHU Forums on Race in America will feature environmentalist Winona LaDuke.

Climate Change Likely to be More Deadly in Poor African Settlements

Conditions in crowded, urban settlements in Africa make worse the effects of climate change, pushing temperatures to dangerous heights for children and the elderly in those areas, according to a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is an additional list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with Hurricane Harvey and now Hurricane Irma

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a third list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.

MEDIA ADVISORY: More Hurricane Harvey Experts from Johns Hopkins University

This is a second list of experts from the Johns Hopkins University on issues associated with the onslaught and aftermath of Hurricane Harvey.