About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Advisory: Johns Hopkins Expert Can Offer Perspective on India’s COVID-19 Crisis

With COVID-19 cases and deaths surging in India, a Johns Hopkins University expert is available to offer context and perspective on the crisis. Michael Levien: A sociologist specializing in India, Levien can discuss what he considers the Indian government’s mishandling of the crisis, as well as the background developmental conditions that are exacerbating the problem.

New Website Predicts Likelihood Of Cyber Attacks Between Nations

The Cyber Attack Predictive Index (CAPI) provides a predictive analysis of nations most likely to engage in the surreptitious strategy waged with keyboards, code and destructive malware rather than soldiers, tanks and airplanes.

Researchers Find ‘Major Transformation’ In Global Climate Policy Ideas

The economic ideas that dominate global climate policy have undergone a “major transformation” over the past three decades from strictly market-based notions to recent diversified approaches featuring more government intervention, according to new research published in Nature Climate Change by a Johns Hopkins University political scientist.

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins University Experts to Brief Capitol Hill on Coronavirus

Johns Hopkins University experts in public health, infectious disease, and emergency preparedness will offer a briefing this Friday for Capitol Hill officials seeking facts and perspective on COVID-19 and the new coronavirus as it spreads worldwide.

ADVISORY: Experts Available to Discuss Role of Antibiotic Resistance in Pandemic Risk

Researchers investigating the drug prescription response to a “superbug” enzyme that renders bacteria resistant to antibiotics are available to discuss why such resistance is posing a growing risk during pandemics such as the current coronavirus.

ADVISORY: Experts Available to Discuss Improving Rapid Detection of Pandemics

Scientists developing a rapid system for tackling outbreaks of avian influenza at their origins in Thailand are available to discuss their project and how it could potentially help improve responses to other pandemic threats such as coronavirus.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss How Racism, Xenophobia Can Spread in Tandem with Coronavirus

A sociology professor at Johns Hopkins University is available to discuss how the racist and xenophobic treatment of people of Chinese ancestry often escalates during outbreaks of disease such as the current coronavirus that began in China and is spreading worldwide.

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss How China’s Politics Affect Coronavirus Response

A sociology professor at Johns Hopkins University is available to discuss whether China’s hardened domestic authoritarianism and expanded global influence since the 2003 SARS outbreak is helping or hindering the international response to the new coronavirus. 

ADVISORY: Expert Available to Discuss New Site to Track Coronavirus

A co-director of the Johns Hopkins University Center for Systems Science and Engineering is available to discuss the center’s website, launched today to track the international spread of coronavirus in real time. The data visualizations are all available for download. 

ADVISORY: Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available

Johns Hopkins Hurricane Experts Available.

Johns Hopkins-Taiwan Team Up in Cross-Cultural Doctoral Program

A new partnership between the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering and Taiwan’s Ministry of Education will bring students from that country to Johns Hopkins’ Homewood campus to pursue doctoral studies in engineering beginning in August 2019.

Johns Hopkins Grad Programs Rank Among Nation’s Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in biomedical engineering, nursing and medicine are once again among the country’s very best, according to the annual U.S. News & World Report ranking of the nation’s “Best Graduate Schools.”

Climate Change Likely to be More Deadly in Poor African Settlements

Conditions in crowded, urban settlements in Africa make worse the effects of climate change, pushing temperatures to dangerous heights for children and the elderly in those areas, according to a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist.

MEDIA ADVISORY: How the U.S. Can Sway North Korea

Johns Hopkins University political scientist Steven David, has a theory about how the United States might be able to influence the leadership of North Korea. He is available for media interviews.

$10 Million Aronson Gift Creates International Studies Center

The chair of the Johns Hopkins University’s board of trustees and his wife have committed $10 million to give students new opportunities in international relations and to enhance scholarly work on major world issues.

New Global Affairs Center at SAIS to Honor Kissinger

Three-term New York City Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg is providing initial funding for a new international policy institute at the Johns Hopkins University named in honor of his long-time friend, former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger.

Johns Hopkins Center for Talented Youth Establishes Program in Greece

A grant to CTY from the Stavros Niarchos Foundation will allow the Center for Talented Youth in collaboration with Anatolia American College to start the CTY in Thessaloniki. The center, which will offer programs for bright students throughout Greece and Southeastern Europe, will welcome its first students in the summer of 2014.

Foreign Affairs Symposium at The Johns Hopkins University

The annual student-run Foreign Affairs Symposium at The Johns Hopkins University is returning to the Homewood campus this month, with several prominent speakers scheduled to appear during the spring semester under the theme, “From the Front Line to the Bottom Line.” Retired Gen. Stanley McChyrstal, who most recently served as commander of the International Security Assistance Force and commander of U.S. Forces Afghanistan, will open the lecture series on Wednesday, Feb. 27.

Vali Nasr Named Dean of Johns Hopkins SAIS

Vali R. Nasr, a leading scholar, foreign policy adviser to Democratic and Republican administrations, and commentator on international relations, has been appointed dean of The Johns Hopkins University’s Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.

Foreign Affairs Symposium at The Johns Hopkins University

The annual student-run Foreign Affairs Symposium at The Johns Hopkins University has returned with several prominent speakers scheduled to visit the Homewood campus during the spring semester.

Media Advisory: Johns Hopkins Engineers Without Borders to Showcase Humanitarian Projects

Members of the Johns Hopkins University chapter of Engineers Without Borders (EWB-JHU) — who have launched humanitarian efforts in Ecuador, Guatemala and South Africa — will discuss their work at the group’s annual showcase on Sunday, Feb. 25.

Media Advisory: A market solution for the Falkland Islands

Should the disputed Falkland Islands be returned to Argentina? In his latest article for Globe Asia, titled “The Falklands and other dangerous disputed territories – a market solution,” Steve Hanke, a professor of applied economics at The Johns Hopkins University, writes that a market solution could help Britain and Argentina avoid another war.

Time for a Change? Johns Hopkins Scholars Say Calendar Needs Serious Overhaul

Researchers at The Johns Hopkins University have discovered a way to make time stand still — at least when it comes to the yearly calendar. Using computer programs and mathematical formulas, Richard Conn Henry, an astrophysicist in the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and Steve H. Hanke, an applied economist in the Whiting School of Engineering, have created a new calendar in which each new 12-month period is identical to the one which came before, and remains that way from one year to the next in perpetuity.

Untrusting Negotiators End Up ‘Paying a Price’

Why do people from different cultures negotiate in different ways? New research shows that different levels of trust account for these divergent strategies, with negotiators from less trusting cultures engaging in behaviors that lead to poor outcomes.

MEDIA ADVISORY: Muslim and Jewish Students to Host 9/11 Commemoration Ceremony at Johns Hopkins

On the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attack, three student groups – the JHU Muslim Association, Hopkins Hillel and S.E.E.D. (Students Educating and Empowering for Diversity) – will conduct a candlelight memorial service for the lives lost and present four scholars who will speak on the significance of the event.