About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Machine Learning Tool Gives Early Warning Of Cardiac Issues in COVID Patients

A team of Johns Hopkins University biomedical engineers and heart specialists have developed an algorithm that warns doctors several hours before hospitalized COVID-19 patients experience cardiac arrest or blood clots.

JHU Undergrads Win $250,000 Prize in Global Mask Design Challenge

A Johns Hopkins University team of 24 undergraduate students that’s come up with a clear, adaptable face mask has won the Future Forward Award in a global challenge to design a better mask.

JHU Undergrads Finalists in Global Mask Design Challenge

A Johns Hopkins University team of 24 undergraduate students that’s come up with a clear, adaptable face mask is among five finalists in a global challenge to design a better mask.

Johns Hopkins Team Develops Software That Cuts Time, Cost From Gene Sequencing

A team of Johns Hopkins University researchers has developed a new software that could revolutionize how DNA is sequenced, making it far faster and less expensive to map anything from yeast genomes to cancer genes.

New Test Can Target and Capture Most Lethal Cells in Fatal Brain Cancer

A laboratory test developed by a research team led by Johns Hopkins University bioengineers can accurately pinpoint, capture and analyze the deadliest cells in the most common and aggressive brain cancer in adults.

Two Johns Hopkins Teams Finalists in Collegiate Inventors Competition

One team has invented a tool that could shave hours from a rhinoplasty. Another has created a sensor that ignores background noise – a device that could improve everything from telemedicine to Zoom calls.

These two Johns Hopkins University teams, a group of undergraduates and a group of graduates, are among the finalists announced today by the Collegiate Inventors Competition, an annual contest founded by the National Inventors Hall of Fame to encourage innovation and entrepreneurship at the collegiate level.

Research Shows Septic Shock Starts Earlier Than Understood And Develops Distinct Levels Of Patient Risk

Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that hospitals can more accurately classify sepsis patients into four distinct categories that would help staff better prioritize early interventions for those at the risk of dying from one of the deadliest, most costly medical conditions in the United States.

New Genetic Analysis Method Could Advance Personal Genomics

Geneticists could identify the causes of disorders that currently go undiagnosed if standard practices for collecting individual genetic information were expanded to capture more variants that researchers can now decipher, concludes new Johns Hopkins University research.

Lighting the Way to Safer Heart Procedures

In the first study of its kind, Johns Hopkins researchers provide evidence that an alternative imaging technique could someday replace current methods that require potentially harmful radiation.

Cancer Tissue-Freezing Approach May Help More Breast Cancer Patients in Lower Income Countries

A new reusable device created by the Johns Hopkins University can help women with breast cancer in lower income countries by using carbon dioxide, a widely available and affordable gas, to power a cancer tissue-freezing probe instead of industry-standard argon.

How the Brain Decides Whether to Hold ’Em or Fold ’Em

Johns Hopkins study sheds light on brain basis of risk-taking behavior January 7, 2019 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Chanapa Tantibanchachai Office: 443-997-9009/ Cell: 928-458-9656 chanapa@jhu.edu @JHUmediareps Picture yourself at a Las Vegas poker table, holding a bad hand – one with a very low chance of winning. Even so, the sight of the large stack […]

JHU collaborates with Morgan, Coppin to promote STEM diversity

With $2.46 million in support from the National Institutes of Health, the Johns Hopkins University is teaming up with two historically black Baltimore institutions, Morgan State and Coppin State universities, to cultivate a diverse group of highly trained biomedical researchers.

JHU Partners with Tsinghua for New Engineering Graduate Program

A new program will allow students to earn graduate degrees from both the Johns Hopkins University’s top-ranked Department of Biomedical Engineering and the world’s No. 1 engineering school, Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

Johns Hopkins-Taiwan Team Up in Cross-Cultural Doctoral Program

A new partnership between the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering and Taiwan’s Ministry of Education will bring students from that country to Johns Hopkins’ Homewood campus to pursue doctoral studies in engineering beginning in August 2019.

New ‘E-Dermis’ Brings Sense of Touch, Pain to Prosthetic Hands

Engineers have created an electronic skin, aiming to restore a real sense of touch for amputees using prosthetic hands.

Souped-up Walker to Help Get Pediatric ICU Patients on Their Feet

An undergraduate student design team is developing a walker designed to help get pediatric ICU patients up and moving as quickly as possible.

Researchers Devise Sensors and Phone App to Find Early Signs of Sickness in Newborns

A Johns Hopkins University team that includes biomedical engineering faculty and graduate students, global health experts and technology specialists will receive a $100,000 grant to support their plan to enable mothers in remote villages to use novel, low-cost sensors and a simple cell phone app to spot serious health problems during their newborn babies’ critical first week. The university’s NeMo team, short for Neonatal Monitoring, was named as one of 51 new Grand Challenges Explorations winners in an initiative funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

JHU Undergrads’ ‘Nasal Relief’ Team Named Finalist in Collegiate Inventors Competition

A Johns Hopkins student team that wants to help people breathe easier has scored a coveted finalist spot in the 2017 Collegiate Inventors Competition, organizers of the event have announced. The students devised a simple, discreet device to open obstructed nostrils, a common problem that can cause snoring and other sleep disruptions, as well as exercising difficulties.

Method Determines Cell Age More Accurately, Could Help Elderly Patients

Led by scientists at Johns Hopkins University, a team of researchers is reporting progress in developing a method to accurately determine the functional age of cells, a step that could eventually help clinicians evaluate and recommend ways to delay some health effects of aging and potentially improve other treatments, including skin graft matching and predicting prospects for wound healing.

Nine Johns Hopkins Engineers Named AIMBE Fellows

Nine faculty members from The Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering have been named Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

Johns Hopkins Graduate Programs Rank Among U.S. News Best

Johns Hopkins University graduate programs in nursing, education, medicine, and biomedical engineering are considered among the best in the country, according to the newest U.S. News & World Report rankings of “Best Graduate Schools.”

New Gene Sequencing Software Could Aid in Early Detection, Treatment of Cancer

A research team from the United States and Canada has developed and successfully tested new computational software that determines whether a human DNA sample includes an epigenetic add-on linked to cancer and other adverse health conditions.

New Bioinformatics Tool Tests Methods for Finding Mutant Genes That ‘Drive’ Cancer

Among the numerous new tactics that aim to spotlight the so-called cancer driver genes, which produce the most accurate results? To help solve this puzzle, a team of Johns Hopkins computational scientists and cancer experts have devised their own bioinformatics software to evaluate how well the current strategies identify cancer-promoting mutations and distinguish them from benign mutations in cancer cells.

Students Seek to Reduce Deaths From Battlefield Injuries That Block Breathing

When a battlefield explosion injures a soldier’s face or neck, the critical air passage between the head and lungs often becomes blocked, which can lead to brain damage and death within minutes. To help treat such injuries, a Johns Hopkins undergraduate team has designed a low-cost, low-tech device dubbed CricSpike that may boost the success rate when combat medics need to create an artificial airway and pump air into the lungs.

Novel Controller Allows Video Gamer Who Lacks Hands to Compete With His Feet

It’s tough to play video games when you have no fingers to push buttons on the controller. Just ask Gyorgy (George) Levay, an avid gamer who lost both hands to a meningitis infection five years ago. But Levay and two fellow Johns Hopkins grad students have devised a clever way get him, and others with similar disabilities, back in the game.