About Johns Hopkins

Recent news from The Johns Hopkins University

This section contains regularly updated highlights of the news from around The Johns Hopkins University. Links to the complete news reports from the nine schools, the Applied Physics Laboratory and other centers and institutes are to the left, as are links to help news media contact the Johns Hopkins communications offices.

 

Hubble Finds Far-Away Planet Vanishing at Record Speed

The speed and distance at which planets orbit their respective blazing stars can determine each planet’s fate—whether the planet remains a longstanding part of its solar system or evaporates into the universe’s dark graveyard more quickly.

In their quest to learn more about far-away planets beyond our own solar system, astronomers discovered that a medium-sized planet roughly the size of Neptune, GJ 3470b, is evaporating at a rate 100 times faster than a previously discovered planet of similar size, GJ 436b.

Media Advisory: Observe the Transit of Venus at Johns Hopkins University Astrophysics Event

The Maryland Space Grant Observatory and Johns Hopkins University are inviting star gazers of every experience level to an event that not only will allow them to view the transit, but also to learn more about it, beginning at 5 p.m. on Tuesday, June 5 at the Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy, 3799 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, 21218.

Team Led By JHU Astrophysicist Catches Black Hole Red-Handed in Stellar Homicide

Astronomers have gathered the most direct evidence yet of a supermassive black hole shredding a star that wandered too close. Astronomers have spotted these stellar homicides before, but this is the first time they can identify the victim. Using a slew of ground- and space-based telescopes, a team of astronomers led by Suvi Gezari of The Johns Hopkins University has identified the victim as a star rich in helium gas. The star resides in a galaxy 2.7 billion light-years away. Her team’s results will appear in the May 3 online edition of the journal Nature.

Johns Hopkins University Offers New Minor in Space Science and Engineering

Students dreaming of careers searching for life on other planets or monitoring global climate change remotely from satellites will be interested in a new interdisciplinary minor being offered at The Johns Hopkins University. Accessed through the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and the Whiting School of Engineering, the new space science and engineering minor is designed to prepare students to enter careers in the aerospace industry or professional laboratories, or to enter graduate programs.

NASA’s Hubble Detects One of the Most Distant Supernovae Yet Observed

A team of Johns Hopkins astrophysicists using NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has detected a distant Type Ia supernova, the farthest stellar explosion that can be used to measure the expansion rate of the universe. The supernova is the remnant of a star that exploded 9 billion years ago.

Adam Riess of Johns Hopkins Accepts 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics

Adam Riess, a professor in physics and astronomy at The Johns Hopkins University and a research scientist at the Space Telescope Science Institute, today accepted the 2011 Nobel Prize in physics from the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences during a ceremony in Stockholm, Sweden.

Johns Hopkins Institute Named as CUDA Center of Excellence by NVIDIA

NVIDIA, the California-based visual computing technology company, has named Johns Hopkins University as a CUDA Center of Excellence, honoring the university’s pioneering use of GPU computing and the CUDA programming model across research within multiple science and engineering departments. The Center of Excellence will be headquartered in Johns Hopkins’ Institute for Data Intensive Engineering and Science, bringing together the expertise of scholars from the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences, the Whiting School of Engineering and the Sheridan Libraries to develop tools and methods capable of mining knowledge from the colossal data sets being produced today. Scientists from the Space Telescope Science Institute, located at the JHU campus are also partnering in the activities of the Center.

Astrophysicist Adam Riess Wins the 2011 Einstein Medal

Adam Riess, an astrophysicist at The Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute, today was awarded the Einstein Medal 2011 by the Albert Einstein Society of Bern, Switzerland. The society board of trustees recognized Riess for leadership in the High-z Supernova Search Team’s 1998 discovery that the expansion rate of the universe is accelerating, a phenomenon widely attributed to a mysterious, unexplained “dark energy” filling the universe. Riess, 41, shares this year’s prize with Saul Perlmutter, an astrophysicist at the University of California, Berkeley and the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, whose Supernova Cosmology Project team published similar results shortly after those published by Riess and High-z teammate Brian Schmidt, of the Australian National University.

“Hubble Repairman” Becomes Research Professor at Johns Hopkins University

NASA astronaut John Grunsfeld has walked in space eight times and logged more than 800 hours floating in that deep, dark void over the course of five space flights, including three to service the Hubble Space Telescope. Now, he is about to explore a new frontier: The Johns Hopkins University. On July 1, the man nicknamed “the Hubble Repairman” became a research professor in the Henry A. Rowland Department of Physics and Astronomy at the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences. While at Johns Hopkins, Grunsfeld, who is deputy director at the nearby Space Telescope Science Institute, will continue his research in astrophysics and the development of new technology and systems for space astronomy.